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    2020 School Board Candidates

    Ypsilanti Community Schools

October 20, 2020

M. Jeanice Townsend

Pronouns:she/her
School District:Ypsilanti Community Schools
City:Ypsilanti

How long have you lived in your district?

30+

Have you received any endorsements?

Yes , Mayor Lois Richardson , City of Ypsilanti Kirk Profit , Former Michigan State Representative Superior Township Trustee Lisa Lewis Pittsfield Township Trustee Linda Edwards-Brown Cherisa Allen , MSW Retired Ypsilanti High School Counselor Beverly Tyler Jeanette Hadden , Community Advocate Dr. Benjamin Edmondson , Former Ypsilanti Community Schools Superintendent Washtenaw County Commissioner Ricky Jefferson Lawrence Hood , Achievement Network Vice President Bryan Foley , Community Advocate Ypsilanti City Councilman Brian Jones-Chance Ypsilanti Township Trustee Jimmie Wilson , Jr. Attorney Terrence Quinn Andy French , Community Business Owner Attorney Arianne Slay Washtenaw County Sheriff Jerry Clayton Kathy Wyatt Attorney Ka’Nea Brooks-Caldwell Emma Jackson , Retired Education Administrator Pastor Jason Robon , Reach Church Washtenaw County Democratic Party – Black Caucus

Are you an incumbent?

No

Why do you want to be a school board member?

I have a passion for children. I want to make sure that every child in this community receives a quality education. I want to be on the team of board members , YCS teachers , staff and administrators , families and community partners who achieve the vision of a transformed school district where “Every family considers Ypsilanti Community Schools a place where they belong , and a crucial part of their identity as learners.”

What does education justice mean to you? What does it mean specifically in the context of your school district?

Education justice means the quality of a school’s education is not determined by geographic location , neighborhood socio economic status , and racial demographics. It means funding all schools equitably – not based on housing prices and not determined by community vote or partisan politics.

In the context of my school district , achieving education justice means not letting our vision of a quality education be limited by our budget restraints. For example , if we are temporarily unable to increase wages due to budget constraints , we need to think outside the box of traditional compensation to develop meaningful incentives and resources to reduce the overall cost of living for our teachers and staff. Strategies for doing this might include a housing down payment assistance program; student loan reduction/forgiveness plans; and tuition reimbursement for continuing education. Washtenaw County is home to educational institutions and responsive community leaders who can help YCS create win/win budget enrichment programs as we work towards long term financial strength and stability.

If you could completely reimagine the way schools look after this public health crisis, what would they look like?

It is my responsibility as a board member to consistently work towards an educational system that works most effectively for every family , and every learner. This public health crisis has given us new insight into what our priorities must be as we move forward. Key ingredients of my vision include:

1) Schools as communities , centers for family learning.

2) Every family has affordable internet access and sufficient equipment and training to use it.

3) Parents as teachers and learners – for example , IT adults teaching other adults how to use computers. We need to have a strong adult education format.

4) Neighborhood learning pods continued outside of school hours.

Describe how you think parents, students, and families should be involved in making decisions within your school district?

As described in a recent article about YCS response to the pandemic , parents , students , families and other community stakeholders are currently being involved in decision making. As a new board member , I will prioritize an assessment of the systems , policies and practices that are in place to make sure families feel they are being heard. I will also work to ensure that their involvement is intentional , strategic and broadly representative.

Who (if any) are your top financial supporters for your campaign?

Myself , family , and friends.

What are your top 3 educational priorities/goals within your school district?

Safety

Equity

Quality

What are your top 3 educational priorities/goals at a state level?

Sufficient and equitable funding.

Strong , consistent and trustworthy relationships between YCS and our state legislators.

Well informed state leaders who recognize the critical role YCS plays in our county.

What challenges do you anticipate this school year to COVID and what do you think your school district must do to keep students & staff safe?

I think the biggest challenge in the upcoming year is how do we provide a quality education post Covid and reinvent ourselves to be a state-of-the-art district that can provide both online and in-person learning with less resources. A component of that would be to create a curriculum that engages our student in deeper learning and cultural relevance. We will also need to create partnerships with our stakeholders that will result in scale growth such creating housing opportunities for our families and career training. Lastly , the other biggest challenge will be , how do we quickly implement systematic changes that will positively affect long term goals for our children.

In order to keep our staff and students safe , we have to listen to the science and create contingency plans that will gradually allow our students and staff to return to our schools. In the meantime , we need to increase our support staff and social workers to help our family and teachers cope with our new way of learner. We will also need for our leaders and community to help with providing additional resources to reinforce our educational goals. In other words , all hands on deck.

What should be your school district’s top spending priorities in their budget? Alternatively, what should not be prioritized your district’s budget?

The schools top priority spending for this current budget will need to be on 1) Making sure that the buildings are safe (updating the HVAC systems are compatible). We must have enough PPE equipment for staff and students. 2) Special education services and resources. 3) Testing – We need to consistently look at our metrics to make sure that our students are staying on course. 4) Support services for our students , families , and staff….equity.

In regards to what we should not to prioritize , as new board member I would need to know all of our current restrictions on our budget and listen to other perspectives from other board members and administration in order to give an opinion.

What role do you think standardized tests should play in your school district?

Continual , reliable and effectively conducted assessment is an absolutely critical component of every school district. The problems with using standardized testing as a measure of teaching and learning success are well documented. Despite the challenges of the testing it is imperative to use the standardized tests. The role of the standardized test coupled with other performance measures will determine next steps for student success.

If you could have an impact on your school district’s curriculum , what changes would you make? What, if anything, would you keep the same?

As a board member , the way I have an impact on my district’s curriculum is by making sure the curriculum experts we employ are highly qualified and reflect the district’s core values in their practice. It is my responsibility to identify a district leader who is experienced and knowledgeable enough to identify and support. In regards to changes , I would make sure that the curriculum creates a feeder program for careers that we now know that our community requires due to the inequities that Covid -19 has brought to light. For example , we need to increase and expand our CTE program to focus on careers in agriculture , trades , entrepreneurship , medical , and legal.

What responsibility do you believe your school district has in supporting students’ and staffs’ mental and emotional health/wellbeing?

Mentally healthy children are more successful in school and life. Research demonstrates that students who receive social–emotional and mental health support achieve better academically. School climate , classroom behavior , on-task learning , and students’ sense of connectedness and well-being all improve as well. Additionally , the American Federation of Teachers (2015) found that 78% of teachers reported feeling physically and emotionally exhausted at the end of the day. The stress that educators experience affects their enthusiasm about the profession and longevity in the field. Knowing this data commissions YCS to implement programs that puts emotional health as a priority. How you treat and support your team should be a direct reflection of your district’s core values.

How do you think your school district should handle student discipline/and make schools a safe place for students and staff?In order to have a proper discipline platform , the district will need to create strong partnerships with our community resources and the court/criminal justice systems that will encourage positive restorative justice practices. We need to make sure that we employ staff that are highly qualified to assist with getting to the core issues that hinder our students from learning. We will need to have a policy that allows a culture shift on how we deal with discipline issues. Our partnership with the criminal justice and court system should help to create alternative response to how we deal with discipline issues while promoting a positive outcomes to help our children succeed. The goal is create productive citizens who are highly educated.

What are your top priorities around special education in your district?

High Quality Instruction – It is clear that we have to support the students’ needs not the labels that are attached to them. We have to view our students as individuals. School is normalized with assistive technology that allows them to access core content. Students are no longer removed from regular instruction. Enabling paraprofessionals , social workers , Title I teachers , special educators to work in concert with the student to close the gap of learning.

School Safety – Employing a mental health interventionist on staff responsible for addressing the range of mild to severe trauma that can impede student functioning. These interventionists also lead schoolwide behavioral initiatives , including bullying reduction and positive behavior supports.

What is your perspective on working towards achieving equity within your school district?

In order to learn , every human being needs an environment where they feel safe , respected and valued. In order to feel welcome in their children’s schools , parents and caring adults need to feel safe , respected and valued in their relationship with their children’s schools. In order to teach effectively , teachers need to feel safe , respected and valued.

In order to create and sustain a truly equitable learning community , we need to identify the ways we , and therefore our educational system , perpetuates inequity and oppression.

Any other information you want to include or share?

My primary goal as a board member is to make sure that every child that comes through YCS succeeds. I want our children to be proud of the education that they received and I want them to be prepared for whatever path of success that they choose.

October 4, 2020

Maria Goodrich

Pronouns:She/Her
School DistrictYpsilanti Community Schools
City:Ypsilanti

How long have you lived in your district?

12 years

Have you received any endorsements?

Washtenaw County Democratic Party, Huron Valley Area Labor Federation, Eastern Washtenaw Democratic Club, 3.14 Action Fund (supporting scientists running for office), State Representative Ronnie Peterson, State Senator Jeff Irwin, Ypsilanti Township Supervisor Brenda Stumbo, Ypsilanti Township Trustee Monica Ross-Williams, Ypsilanti City Council Member Steve Wilcoxen, Ypsilanti City Council Member Annie Somerville, Former Ypsilanti Community Schools Board of Education President Sharon Irvine, Former Ypsilanti Public Schools Board of Education Vice President Kira Berman, Former Ypsilanti Community Schools Superintendent Benjamin Edmondson, Former Ypsilanti Public Schools Teacher Herman Humes, Peri Stone-Palmquist, Gail Wolkoff, and other community leaders

Are you an incumbent?

No

Why do you want to be a school board member?

I want to help ensure that all students in my district have access to equitable, excellent, and ambitious educational opportunities: equitable in that all students get the opportunities and resources needed to reach their full potential; excellent in that teachers are empowered and supported in providing engaging, high quality, culturally competent instruction; and ambitious in that we let nothing and no one put false limits on what any child can achieve.

I believe in the promise and the necessity of excellent, strong public schools, and I want to serve and support the kids of my community, and by extension all the people and services needed to ensure their success.

I have had the privilege of working with families, teachers, administrators, and community partners throughout the YCS district who all have so much to offer to our kids, and I want to be part of bringing all those voices to the table. I have also taught really smart, really capable young adults who successfully made it to college but did not have confidence in their own abilities, or who were just tired from fighting against barriers.

There are no perfect answers to the challenges that face public education right now, but I feel a responsibility to seek out the kind of universal design solutions that can support the most vulnerable, make the system more equitable, and benefit every student who the district serves.

What does education justice mean to you? What does it mean specifically in the context of your school district?

As a longtime follower of the work of 482Forward (and as of August, a proud new member) I don’t think I can articulate it any better than the stakeholder-defined parameters embraced by that organization: Education justice requires equitable funding, accountable governance with stakeholder voice, rich culturally competent curricular resources, teachers who are provided with the supports and resources they need, wraparound supports to ensure that each child is able to succeed and thrive, schools that are welcoming and inclusive for students and families, and equitable access to special education services.

While the guidelines from 482Forward were developed for Detroit public schools, I think they are equally relevant to Ypsilanti Community Schools. In many ways we face a very similar set of challenges packaged into a much smaller school district. Instead of being surrounded by more affluent suburbs, Ypsi is encircled by the wealthier communities of Washtenaw County. Every single point identified is above is an area for growth in our district. In some places we are making excellent strides: our administration and teachers are embracing the teaching of Gholdi Mohammed and seeking to cultivate the genius in each of our children, the assistant superintendent is discussing formally adopting the 1619 Curriculum, and our Blueprint Network has been working hard to develop a robust Intense Student Support Network to make sure wraparound supports are in place and accessible. However, regarding equitable funding, we need only look down the road to Ann Arbor where the state funding model values students there at over $1,100 more than those in Ypsi. The lack of equitable funding has ripple effects throughout our district, feeding into a “failing schools” narrative that drives families away and further stresses our school budgets. On top of that, our district carries a debt that takes $2 million away from our teachers and students every year when our total budget is only $58 million.

If you could completely reimagine the way schools look after this public health crisis, what would they look like?

There are so many possible directions to go with this that I hardly know where to start…

One thing that I think the public health crisis (and the resulting online education adaptations) has forced us to examine is how we meet students’ educational needs and best use the time that students and teachers have together. Knowing that long stretches of Zoom are not good for students, we have needed to be creative and intentional about what instruction is done asynchronous and what kinds of teaching are worth the precious synchronous time that is available. I would love to see us be much more flexible about what the school day looks like, and maximize the opportunities for interactivity among teachers and students during the time that they are in class.

The pandemic has also thrown into stark relief the magnitude of the inequities in our educational system. The kids whose schools are already chronically under-resourced are also many of the same kids whose families are more acutely affected by COVID. Even when districts like YCS make equity-minded plans to prioritize the most effective in-person instruction for those who need it most, some families are understandably finding the risk too grave. I want to see us take a hard look at how resources are distributed and demand that funding be both adequate and equitable in all schools.

One interesting silver lining of the pandemic has been the opportunity to be a daily guest in my child’s classroom, and to be better-able to support her learning because I know what she works on with her teacher. I think that this is a positive that we can carry past the pandemic, both by making families welcome in their children’s schools, and by improving communication to families and giving them straightforward, practical opportunities to support their child’s learning at home in a way that helps expand on their explorations in the classroom.

Describe how you think parents, students, and families should be involved in making decisions within your school district?

Parent, student, and family voice needs to be integrated into district decision-making. This must be something far more than individual stakeholders coming to speak for three minutes at a school board meeting. The district needs to seek out and facilitate participation from a diverse range of families that reflects the socioeconomic, cultural, and racial composition of the population that they serve. It isn’t enough to ask for volunteers – teachers and principals can take an active role in recruiting and encouraging potential participants, and the district can bring conversations to the venues and through the formats that are most accessible to the families they desire to hear from. Parent, student, and community member advisory commissions can provide a rich source of wisdom and perspective that the district can draw upon when considering new initiatives or tackling thorny problems

Who (if any) are your top financial supporters for your campaign?

My family and myself – the rest is made up of smaller donations from friends and community members

What are your top 3 educational priorities/goals within your school district?

Adopting (and supporting!) high-quality, culturally competent, ambitious curriculum across all subject areas at all grade levels

Implementing restorative justice practices at scale throughout the district and eliminating disproportionate discipline practices toward students of color

Integrating literacy learning and support across all subject areas and ensuring that engaging science and social studies instruction is not neglected

What are your top 3 educational priorities/goals at a state level?

Achieving equitable school funding

Abolishing for-profit charter schools and revising the foundation allowance allocation for school choice

Eliminating high-stakes standardized testing and adopting better metrics for student, teacher, and school success

What challenges do you anticipate this school year to COVID and what do you think your school district must do to keep students & staff safe?

The biggest challenge is balancing the most effective public health interventions with best practices for education, especially for those students who are most marginalized.

COVID safety while in person requires small class sizes to facilitate distancing, good ventilation, scrupulous mask-wearing, and plentiful personal protective equipment. The resources and facilities needed to achieve that for all children in our district simply do not exist. We have neither the space nor the staff to keep class sizes as small as they would need to be for the entire student population, and too many of our classrooms don’t even have windows that can be opened to improve air flow.

The alternative that YCS has landed upon seems to be the best we can do in an extremely challenging situation. By using the best available facilities for our current condition but filling them far below capacity to allow spacing I think the district is doing an admirable job of serving and protecting the students who most need the benefit of in-person instruction. At the same time, plenty of vulnerable students do not feel safe coming to school, and they and the rest of the student population are relying on distance education. It is imperative that while we take these measures to ensure physical health and safety we also throw our efforts and resources strongly behind adapting and creating high quality distance learning.

What should be your school district’s top spending priorities in their budget? Alternatively, what should not be prioritized your district’s budget?

The first priority should always be the kids and anything that affects their learning. This includes attracting and retaining (and supporting and equitably compensating!) excellent teachers, investing in high quality culturally competent curricula, and making sure that wraparound supports are available to help ensure that our most marginalized students are safe, secure, and ready to learn.

It is harder to identify the things that should not be prioritized. I think that efficiencies can be realized (as has been done in our district) through more efficient facilities upgrades, better busing routes, and adoption of sustainable technology life cycles. One of the changes I am most proud of, and which served fiscal responsibility and educational equity, was the decision to remove police officers from our buildings with the intention of reallocating those funds to support staff who can more effectively support a safe culture and climate in our schools.

What role do you think standardized tests should play in your school district?

I honestly do not know – it is easier to say what role they should not play. As I see it the issues with standardized tests are two-fold. 1) The tests as they are now written are biased and not culturally competent. 2) The data from those tests are too often used punitively (and inaccurately) in evaluation of teachers and schools – both officially in the hands of government officials and school administrators, and unofficially in the hands of parents making school choices based on poor data analysis.

If you could have an impact on your school district’s curriculum , what changes would you make? What, if anything, would you keep the same?

I think that my district has made some good curricular choices, informed by some really excellent teacher input. However, I worry about our ability to carve out the time to fully support, implement, and adapt those resources. In my time as a science consultant for my district I saw high quality curricular resources languish in storage in some buildings because of staffing shortages, and I worked with teachers who were exhausted and deeply overextended by trying to manage all those materials and learn them on the fly without adequate time for professional development and collaborative support from colleagues.

One curricular change I would love to see is a more intentional emphasis on science and social studies. These subjects are too often marginalized, especially at the elementary level, by the urgency around literacy and math. However, when we neglect these students miss the opportunity to grasp foundational concepts and develop critical skills that are needed in future classes. Additionally, research shows that literacy instruction integrated into engaging science and social studies content substantially improves reading skill. Of course, that science and social studies content that is taught needs to be relevant, engaging, and of high quality – to that end I applaud my district in exploring the adoption of social studies curricula like the 1619 Project.

What responsibility do you believe your school district has in supporting students’ and staffs’ mental and emotional health/wellbeing?

I think it is incredibly important that schools can be a place to access vital mental health resources. Many of our kids are wrestling with trauma and need additional supports; likewise, teachers and staff can be subjected to overwhelming amounts of secondary trauma as they seek to support their students. Also, I feel that by providing high quality support services in this area schools can help destigmatize mental health struggles and make it easier for students to identify challenges early and reach out for help.

How do you think your school district should handle student discipline/and make schools a safe place for students and staff?

I believe in the potential and the efficacy of restorative justice, and I would love to see it implemented well and at scale throughout my district. (In truth, it has received a lot of attention in YCS, but turnover in teachers and administrators seems to have made it challenging to maintain.) Above all I think our focus needs to be on repairing harm and making it possible for students to productively return to learning. Counselors and support staff are needed to support this work and help work on the root causes of behavior issues. We also need to be very clear-eyed about unconscious bias and resorting to disciplinary actions when they are neither necessary or appropriate. Above all, we need to keep kids in school with access to the myriad resources that school can provide; suspensions and expulsions only serve to further marginalize students who are already at risk.

What are your top priorities around special education in your district?

I think that we need to ensure that we are providing equitable and high quality special education services that are tailored to the needs of individual students, and that we are furnishing the supports to allow those students to be mainstreamed whenever possible and appropriate. I don’t want to see any student denied access to exciting and challenging learning or subjected to false limitations on their potential.

What is your perspective on working towards achieving equity within your school district?

Equity is a word that gets thrown around a ton in education, and I’m certain that I am guilty of overusing it in the context of this questionnaire. My understanding of true equity is still evolving – right now Angela Glover Blackwell’s definition resonates with me most strongly: just and fair inclusion into a society in which all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential. Ultimately, we need to look at the needs of the most marginalized and identify the universal design solutions to overcome the systemic barriers that hold them back. By putting our efforts and priorities there, we have the power to improve outcomes for everyone.

Any other information you want to include or share?

This was an excellent and challenging questionnaire. I’m still learning and evolving in my understanding of many of these issues. One thing I promise if elected to the school board (or, frankly, even if I’m not), is that I will never stop being open to new perspectives, information, and understanding. I am keenly aware that I do not have all the answers, and I know that it is only by integrating our collective wisdom that we can identify and pursue the changes that will benefit everyone.

October 4, 2020

Yvonne Fields

Pronouns:She/Her
School DistrictYpsilanti Community Schools
City:Ypsilanti

How long have you lived in your district?

20+ years

Have you received any endorsements?

Yes; endorsements from Gail Quann, Ypsilanti Jr. Braves (youth community football league), Anthony Williamson, Brenda McKinney, Caroline Sanders, Crystal Harding, Darryl Covington, DeBorah Borden, Dr. Kenya Ayers-Palmore, Dr. Sandra Harris, Eastern Washtenaw Democratic Club, Elinda Burks, Floyd & Flora Brumfield, Hazelette Crosby, Helen Gates-Bryant, Henri Parker, Jason Morgan, Jessica Roache, Linda Howard, Nate Frazier, Sharon & Joe Person, Teesha & Christina Montague, Washtenaw County Black Caucus, Washtenaw Democratic Party, Pastor Courtney Jenkins, Pastor Harold Wimberly, Elder Malcolm Rowry, Educator’s Union – MEA-PAC, https://www.vote4fields2020.com/endorsements

Are you an incumbent?

No

Why do you want to be a school board member?

I want to be a school board member because of my love for children, my passion for technology and education, and wanting to serve my community.

What does education justice mean to you? What does it mean specifically in the context of your school district?

Education justice means to me being able to provide every student with quality education from quality teachers. It means raising children who are well-rounded and preparing them to be the best citizens they can be in our society. It also means addressing the disparities in the school system. For my school district specifically, it means meeting students where they are at and raising the bar. Not only raising the standards, but also equipping them to be able to meet these standards.

If you could completely reimagine the way schools look after this public health crisis, what would they look like?

If I could reimagine the schools look after this pandemic, I would offer both distance learning and face-to-face learning in public schools. Digital learning is only going to grow as technology is becoming more advanced. Learning will be happening in schools, at home, in the community and beyond.

Describe how you think parents, students, and families should be involved in making decisions within your school district?

I think there should be representation of a parent and student at the board meetings who would be the voice the the parents and students. Having a place where parents/students/families could voice their concerns, and a representative delivers this information to the School Board. They are the stakeholders in the district. Their voices must be heard to ensure a more collaborative approach.

Who (if any) are your top financial supporters for your campaign?

I have been equally supported by many in the community.

What are your top 3 educational priorities/goals within your school district?

My top three educational priorities/goals include increasing teacher retention and parent involvement, improve graduation rate, and more funding to provide resources for additional technology education.

What are your top 3 educational priorities/goals at a state level?

My top three goals are advocating for more funding for schools that have lower achievement scores, collaborating with neighboring school districts to share information, and addressing the disparities seen in standardized testing.

What challenges do you anticipate this school year to COVID and what do you think your school district must do to keep students & staff safe?

One of the challenges is that not all students can adapt to online-learning. As well as not all parents will be able to provide the support needed to help them at home. As a school district there needs be periodic assessments to see how well the students are adapting to this new way of learning and retaining the information.
Keep up positive interaction with students and families. All students learn differently so for some, distance learning will be a challenge. For the students who are struggling to adapt, the district should continue working on finding resources that will help them to succeed.

Continue the communication, education, and the reinforcement of appropriate hygiene and social distancing practices in ways that could be understood no matter the age of the child, the teachers, and staff. Make decisions that take into account the level of community transmission of COVID. Develop a proactive plan for when a student or staff members tests positive for COVID 19. Stay in touch with the local health department to stay updated on COVID 19 transmission and response in your area.

What should be your school district’s top spending priorities in their budget? Alternatively, what should not be prioritized your district’s budget?

The top spending priorities should be providing resources to help assist teachers in providing a quality education to each student. I would also like to priorities retaining teachers and more professional development. The top spending priority should also be on enhancing technology and the staff to support it.

What role do you think standardized tests should play in your school district?

Standardized tests do play a role in my school district, but I believe it is often designed to measure only one portion of the student. Often it’s too generic and does not capture all of the nuances for each district. I would like it to be used in conjunction with other measures to get a better picture of each students’ progress.

If you could have an impact on your school district’s curriculum , what changes would you make? What, if anything, would you keep the same?

The changes I would make to my district’s curriculum is increasing STEM education. It is being taught in the middle school, but I would have it become one-third of the school year curriculum. I would also have it follow the students from elementary school thru high school.

For example learning coding at an early age helps children understand how things work, i.e. video games, phones, computers, and tablets. Ypsilanti Community Schools already offers a strong curriculum I would just like to add coding earlier in the learning process.

What responsibility do you believe your school district has in supporting students’ and staffs’ mental and emotional health/wellbeing?

My school district has a significant responsibility in supporting students’ and staffs’ mental and emotional wellbeing. When we have a healthy mental and emotional wellbeing we, students and staff, can show up as the best versions of ourselves. It is also important for the district to provide resources to not only address emotional and mental issues when they interrupt the learning environment, but also promote ways to identify mental health wellness and practices.

How do you think your school district should handle student discipline/and make schools a safe place for students and staff?

To always suspend students outside of the school is not always necessary. I agree with in-school suspension, of course depending on the circumstance. Having different forms of discipline in place is always useful. For example, the same student may be exhibiting bad choices often, by digging more into that students background or home life (i.e. death of a loved one, family suffering financially, lack of food, …) could be cause for some of the behaviors they are showing so this students discipline could be different than another students discipline.

What are your top priorities around special education in your district?

My top priorities around special education are more para professionals to be able to provide more one-on-one time, more support for the students who have a special education needs and struggles with distance learning, and more support for the parents.

What is your perspective on working towards achieving equity within your school district?

I believe that achieving equity in my school district will be a continuous goal, but it can be done. We have to continue to look at root causes and address them. All students must have equal access to quality education and resources to ensure they have a fair chance as productive members of society.

Any other information you want to include or share?

More information about my campaign can be found at: www.vote4fields2020.com